Voters Size Up Choices

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In less than 80 days American voters will choose who will become President of the United States in January, 2017.

While there are four or five real options this election, the two major party candidates are the most likely to win enough Electoral College votes to move into the Oval Office.

Pew Research recently asked voters their thoughts about Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

Not surprised that neither Clinton nor Trump scored well on whether, if elected, either would be a great or even good president. When you consider that both are the least liked and least trusted runners for the White House in anyone’s memory.

goodgreatprezAs is evident in the above chart, the majority view both Clinton and Trump to be an average to terrible president. Clinton does better with 67% saying average, poor or terrible. Trump gets trounced with 70% saying not good for the presidency.

Voters tend to split based on who they support on what are the main issues, problem areas in this election cycle.

problemsAs you can see, however, there is a convergence whether a Trump or Clinton supporter when it comes to race and ethnic group relations.

Trump supporters see immigration as the main problem facing the nation while for Clinton supporters it is the gap between rich and poor.

Terrorism ranks high for fans of Trump, but for Clinton voters it is below 40%.

Trump is running as the law and order candidate and more than half of his supporters see crime as a problem while a bit over 40% of Clinton voters think it is.

The availability of good paying jobs concern nearly half of Trump voters, but for Clinton supporters not so much.

Bernie Sanders and Green Party Dr. Jill Stein may have put emphasis on the environment which shows with Clinton supporters at over 40%, those voting for Trump see it as just blipping on the radar.

Going against Republican orthodoxy, Trump has been shooting hard at free trade agreements. Clinton had touted the Trans Pacific Partnership as the “gold standard” of trade agreements until she caved under pressure from Sanders and now does not support it.

What is the feeling of voters about trade?

tradeNearly 60% of Clinton supporters (Sorry, Bernie) favor free trade agreements. Trump supporters are overwhelmingly against by nearly 70%.

According to Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, if elected, Clinton will sign and back the TPP, which would line up with her supporters on the trade pact. For almost 60% of Trump voters that would be a mistake.

Clinton is running for a continuation of Democratic policies under President Barack Obama and even saying a win would be a third Obama term. Trump, on the other hand, is railing against the Establishment and doing business the way it has always been done in Washington DC.

But has the country changed so much in the past half century a change candidate is needed?

changeBackers of Trump say it has and life is worse now than 50 years ago. A super majority of 81% of those going to the polls in November for The Donald feel that way. Contrast this to nearly 60% of Clinton voters who believe life is better now than then.

Whether the next generation will have a better life than we currently enjoy, Clinton supporters are split with 30% saying it will be worse and just under 40% saying it will be better.

A minuscule 11% think that the next generation life will be better among Trump backers. The vast majority think it will be worse for our children and grandchildren.

From the Cornfield, is it any wonder that people are taking second and third looks at Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green’s Stein when there is such a divide in the way Americans are thinking and viewing the election?