To Those Who Served – Salute!

From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield

Today, we stop and give thanks for all those who have served the nation in uniform, protecting the freedoms we hold so dear. Some gave the ultimate sacrifice of their lives in order to ensure that we have the life we so proudly proclaim.

Their sacrifice is honored with each election where not by coup, but by ordinary Americans casting a ballot and choosing those who will lead and represent them. The power and authority of those officials are transferred from one elected official to the next, from the precinct level to the highest office in the land, the Presidency, without the need for troops in the streets because of those who answered the call to duty, honor and service.

The ability to vote, the ability to choose, the ability to speak our minds, the ability to worship or not worship, the ability to write these words without fear, the ability to work, to succeed, to fail, to rise above our circumstances, all of this we owe to those men and women who fought for peace, justice and freedom.

None of our liberties came without cost and thus we owe a debt to each of our veterans and to those who still serve.

On a more personal note:

Normandy Award to Luther C. Powell

In those dark days following the sneak attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, four brothers from Nashville, Brown County, Indiana lined up at the recruiting office and joined the US Navy. These four brothers went off to save the world for democracy both in the European Theater and in the Pacific.

Three made it back home at the close of World War II. The one who didn’t return was my Uncle Homer. My grandfather and his other two brothers, Herman and Wesley, came home, but changed, never to be the same.

First Sergeant Jack L. Hollifield

My step-father, a fresh-faced kid from Sullivan County, Indiana didn’t wait to be drafted. He went to the recruiting office and signed up to be a soldier for Uncle Sam. He survived, though wounded once, three tours in Viet Nam. He remained in the US Army to retire after 20 years as an E-8 First Sergeant.

USN veteran Allen Powell

My grandfather’s only son, my uncle, later followed in his father’s footsteps and sailed off on the ocean blue with the Navy. He served around the world, then came home.

Allen's Honorable Discharge

All of these veterans within my own family are now gone, but not forgotten.

AFC Mark after USAF Basic Training

Their service made it possible for me to join the US Air Force in 1976. My time was spent at Grissom AFB, right here in the Cornfield.

It also allowed my step-brother, John Hollifield, a few years later to join the US Army. Unfortunately, we lost him in a drunk driving incident after he did his duty and was home.

The sacrifice of my grandfather, great-uncles and step-father also allowed all of us to still be living in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

This is why I am always appreciative of those who choose to serve in our military. This is why I always have an empathy and a connection to the families left behind to keep the home fires burning to shine the light to lead our service members home.

Each November 11th, we celebrate, not just the veterans of that long ago war that was to be the war to end all wars, but the holiday has evolved to celebrate and to show appreciation for all who have served our great nation and those who continue to serve.

From the Cornfield, veterans, I salute you and thank you!

Lest We Forget – 9/11/2001

From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield

It seemed to be a quiet, sunny day in the dwindling hours of summer. People going about their business. Children rushed off to school. Flights of pleasure, business and fancy were seemingly soaring the skies peacefully.

Tranquility and a sense of safety were shattered in an instant as a commercial jetliner plowed into the World Trade Center (WTC). What first seemed to be nothing more than a tragic accident was quickly revealed to be more diabolic in nature.

The world watched horror-struck as a second jetliner in live airtime was shown deliberately crashing into the second tower of the WTC.

The unthinkable, that which seemed to only be comprehensible in a movie script, lifted from the page of fiction into the horrifying fact of reality. Life changed forever.

9-11-2

I rolled over. Opened my eyes. With blurred vision, I looked at the clock. 10:48 a.m. I sprang out of bed, shaking my head, wondering why I had slept so late.

I grabbed my robe, moving between my loveseats to turn on the television. I made my way back around what I called, my loveseat, to make my morning coffee.

Strangely I heard the voices of Katie Couric and Matt Lauer. In disbelief, disconcerted and shocked, I listened and learned about the attack on America.

Nearly spilling the water, I finished making my coffee. I stumbled back to my loveseat to watch and listen to the unfolding events.

I yelled at the troubled young man sleeping on my other loveseat, “Wake up! We’ve been attacked!

Frightened, not knowing what to do, how to react, what to say, the young man took off on his bike. Running, trying to find comfort, peace and some sense of what was happening.

I stayed glued to the TV.

Not only had two commercial planes been used as guided missiles exploding into the WTC, but another had been fatally directed at the Pentagon.

But, this was not the end.

The news revealed a fourth jetliner, its objective still unknown, was deflected from further mass destruction by the heroics of passengers. Passengers, who followed the highest law of Love.

Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” John 15:13 (KJV)

The unthinkable had become a deliberate, thought-out scheme of murder, destruction, mayhem, pain and suffering.

What had happened to America’s tranquility and safety?

Gone in moments.

What were and are we to do?

What could and can our leaders do?

What was and is America to do?

Life changed forever.

From the Cornfield, we pause, as we do each year, and remember the lives lost, the heroes, the resolve of a nation to not back down, to rise from the ashes and press on for a better day filled with peace, liberty and justice for all.

We will never forget.

We will never crumble.

We will stand tall.

We will cross any valley, climb any mountain, ford any stream and remain forever that shining city on a hill to which the world looks to find light in the darkness of ignorance, fear, intolerance and injustice.

No Electoral Majority – Then What?

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As if this election cycle has not been bizarre enough, what if come January 6, 2017 no one wins a majority of the Electoral College?

What happens if neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton reach the magic 270 votes from the electors of the 50 states and the District of Columbia?

Article II Section 1 of the US Constitution sets up the Electoral College and what to do in the event no candidate receives a majority of electors.

It is not that there is no precedence of nominees not reaching the requisite number in our 240-year history since proclaiming our independence from Great Britain.

Yet in each of those cases in history, it has not been a pretty affair.

Most recently, most of us can recall when this came close to happening in Election Year 2000 when sitting Vice President Al Gore won the popular vote to challenger George W. Bush as the Florida votes were in dispute.

In that situation, which Democrats refer to the election robbed and handed to Bush, the third branch of government, the Supreme Court, stepped in and decided along ideological lines (conservative versus liberal) that Florida went to the Bush column.

Crisis averted.

The first instance took place shortly after the birth of the nation in 1800. Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, won as Congress voted to make him the nation’s third President.

However, the opposition Federalist Party members of the House of Representatives considered giving the presidency to his vice presidential pick, Aaron Burr, instead.

The Federalists had backed John Adams for a second term.

What triggered the House stepping in to decide the election was that the Democratic-Republican Party, which backed Jefferson and Burr, gave each 73 electoral votes, thus triggering the need for the House to step in and decide the election.

Following this debacle, since at the time the top and second vote getters were elected President and Vice President, the 12th Amendment was ratified in 1804 which called for the two nominees for the top slots in the Executive Branch be from the same party.

For a few years all was sane, then came the 1824 Election pitting Andrew Jackson against Henry Clay, John Quincy Adams and William H. Crawford, the sitting Treasury Secretary.

There was no majority of electors.

Under the 12th Amendment, the top three vote getters would be cast to the House of Representatives for a vote. Clay was out, but agreed to throw his support behind Adams in exchange for becoming Secretary of State for the son of the first Adams to be President.

Jackson had won the popular vote, but the Clay-Adams could not be beaten.

In an election that gave rise to the image of powerful men with cigars in a smoke-filled back room making deals to decide the fate of the Oval Office, Rutherford B. Hayes became President in the 1876 Election although rival Samuel J. Tilden had won the popular vote.

Under a commission set up by Congress to determine which slate of state electors to seat in the event a state submitted competing rosters of electors, but the commission kept splitting 8-7 to over which slate to seat from Florida, South Carolina and Louisiana.

Hayes cut a deal with commission members to withdraw Reconstruction Era federal troops from the South in exchange for the South to protect and respect the rights of freed blacks.

The commission approved the slates of Hayes’ electors handing the election to him.

Although Hayes kept his word and withdrew federal troops, as history has shown us, it was nearly a century later before the South finally lived up to its end of the bargain.

There is also the unusual situation where Gerald Ford became President after Richard Nixon resigned from office rather than be impeached over the Watergate scandal.

Ford, a member of the Michigan House delegation, was elevated to be Vice President after Spiro T. Agnew was removed from the vice presidency on charges of taking bribes while Governor of Maryland. This set-up the situation for Ford to become the first and only President of the United States to have not been elected to office.

This brings us to this weird year. We have the two most unpopular candidates for office ever as the nominees or soon to be of the two major parties – Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

There is rebellion among Establishment and some conservative Republicans who have lined up as #NeverTrump. These GOP members are looking for another candidate to support. The opposition to Trump even includes the GOP 2012 nominee, Mitt Romney.

With Democrats there are those who felt “the Bern” and pledged their all to Bernie Sanders. Uncle Bernie today endorse Clinton. His supporters, however, are not falling inline and looking for an alternative.

Independent voters, the largest voting bloc, are not happy with the choices being set before them. Independents want a real vote, not a vote against someone instead of for someone.

This brings us to third party candidate from the Libertarian Party, former Republican New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson.

Although no one expects Johnson has any chance of winning the White House, there is the possibility the Republican turned Libertarian could match or best the showing of either Ross Perot in the 1990s or George Wallace in the 1960s.

What if Johnson drew enough votes from the Sanders camp, the disgruntled Republicans and perplexed independents to not win the Electoral College, but to prevent either Trump or Clinton from getting a majority?

The election outcome would then fall into the House of Representatives where each state would have one vote.

A simple majority would determine the presidency.

A simple majority would also with a vacancy on the Supreme Court could determine which direction the Judiciary Branch would travel for at least a generation.

This means that the down ballot races are even more important than ever before. Who controls the House of Representatives controls the fate of both the Executive and Judicial Branches of Government.

From the Cornfield, this one year that one vote, your vote could make a difference.

This is not a year to sit out.

References:

http://www.leinsdorf.com/House.htm

http://history.house.gov/Institution/Electoral-College/Electoral-College/

Memories of Yesteryear

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Before retiring last night and after I rose this morning, I have not been able to stop the memories of yesteryear from flooding my mind.

It was the summer of 1968, prior to my returning to school for my freshman year of high school. We were living in Aurora, Illinois at the time.

It was a summer of unrest. Riots and demonstrations in the streets flooded the nightly newscasts on all three of the only networks of the time – ABC, CBS and NBC.

I was already something of a history and political buff. So I watched intently to the scenes playing out on our color television.

The images were much more real than what they were that other July night watching on a black-and-white screen as President John F. Kennedy warned the nation about the Red Scare 70 miles off our coast, which I had watched as a second grader living in Anderson, Indiana.

Come to think of it – it had been a decade of unrest.

The standoff with the USSR, the assassination of President Kennedy, the social upheaval of the hippies and flower children, the assassination of Bobby Kennedy, the marches of those seeking civil rights for all, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, the burning of bras and draft cards, the running away to Canada, the protests against the Viet Nam War, Woodstock – all were part of this decade.

Now in July of 1968, transfixed I watched the National Guard on the streets of Chicago a mere 60 miles away. I saw mounted police trampling on protesters. I saw the barricades, the smoke from tear gas, from Molotov cocktails, bloodied faces outside the Democratic National Convention.

I watched protesters dragged out of the convention. I saw the inability of nominee Hubert Humphrey to quell the unrest.

It was total chaos. A couple of weeks later, I remember Everett Dirksen, our own Senator, take control at the Republican National Convention. I watched as if in a trance as Dirksen had the hall on its feet reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.

But it was still a summer, a decade of unrest.

Over the past week, once more I have been transfixed seeing reminders of that summer nearly 50 years ago.

The killings.

The marches in the streets.

Presidential nominating conventions in the wings.

The saying goes that history repeats itself.

We are also admonished to learn from the past so as not to make the same mistakes.

Have we learned nothing?

From the Cornfield, America the Beautiful, God shed His grace on Thee.

Happy Birthday, US of A!

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On Monday, the US of A celebrates its 240th birthday.

It was, like with any birth, one that was born out of travail, crying, shouts of glee, bloodshed and even death. Truly the continent was in heavy labor as the push and screams of thousands were heard around the world.

That sorrow and agony gave way, however, to jubilation as the nation emerged covered with the scars and trappings of nativity. But as difficult as that birth was, the struggle was not over.

There would be growing pains, illnesses and diseases to overcome. There would be those who would attempt to reclaim and to destroy that life which was born out of a pledge to devote honor, lives and fortunes to see this epic birth come to be and last through all time.

Through the years, as with any baby maturing to toddler to child to teen to adult, this great nation of states joined to form a “more perfect union” had to go through its share of perils, tests and trials. In each instance, in the end, the US of A emerged on the other side a better nation.

The most trying time is undisputed, which is what occurred during what I would call the teenage years, puberty, when literally brother was pitted against brother, sister against sister, sons and daughters against mothers and fathers. The greatest and most costly toll of lives and bloodshed threatened to tear the nation apart. Yet through the trauma of the Civil War, the War Between the States, a united and stronger country came of age.

Dark days still lay ahead, but it seemed the worst had passed.

Through more battles and more wars, we find ourselves today celebrating the nation we’ve become and feeling the pain of the mistakes we have made. We honor the lives who gave their all to keep this nation the home of the brave and the land of the free.

Now, we look forward to the days and years ahead.

We are traveling the rough and choppy sea of economic uncertainty, but which seems to be slowly recovering.

The ship of state must traverse the gulf as the skipper maneuvers the ship to avoid crashing on the rocks of lost hope, despair, keeping an eye on the course and the port of serenity which lies in the distance.

The tides of global unrest threaten to engulf us. We must stay resolute and strong. Together we can ride the waves and dock in safe harbor.

Many have lost hope.

Many no longer aspire to the American Dream.

Many wonder if the flag will still wave for much longer.

But we are Americans.

We will survive.

From the Cornfield, America, may she always be that shining city on a hill to which others seek to aspire.

Happy Independence Day!

Remembering D-Day

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Today, June 6th, 2016 is dedicated the memory of all those who gave their lives on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France 68 years ago in what proved to be the drive that led to the fall of the Nazi regime and brought peace to a world torn by war.

My grandfather and great uncles were among those who served. One of my great uncles, Hobart Powell, did not return from that war. Though I never was given the pleasure of knowing him, he is still alive in our hearts and memories.

Of those who assaulted the beach that day, some came home, but many were left dying or dead in the sand. As the Nazi forces tried to beat back the coalition forces of Allied powers, the German High Command failed to understand the resolve of these brave soldiers to make the world safe, to end the scourge of the Nazi atrocities and to bring peace to a troubled people.

Those efforts, those deaths were not in vain. The comrades of those who had been killed kept pressing on until they marched into Berlin and put an end to the tyranny.

From the Cornfield, pause with me now to remember and to salute those who gave their lives and all of those whom Tom Brokaw rightly labeled, “The Greatest Generation“.

A Debt We Can Never Repay

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Today is Memorial Day.

It is a time to stop, reflect and remember those military personnel who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to maintain and protect our freedom and way of life in the US of A.

The tradition of Memorial Day originally began in commemoration of those soldiers lost during the Civil War. It was known in various communities and states as Decoration Day. The date set aside was May 30. This was later changed to allow for a 3-day weekend by Congress to be the last Monday in May.

For the vast majority of Americans it is just another holiday weekend and the unofficial start to the summer vacation season. For many others it’s the weekend when millions around the world tune in to watch or listen to the greatest spectacle in racing, the Indy 500.

To too many it’s just a day to get together with family, have picnics and barbecues, go to the opening of community pools across the nation.

It’s a time to lay back and enjoy having three days off in a row with no worries.

Yet, Memorial Day symbolizes much more.

Ask any veterans’ organization or any military person in uniform or any family member who has lost a loved one in war, whether declared or undeclared, in peacetime or wartime.

Memorial Day was meant to be a day upon which a grateful nation pauses to remember those who donned a uniform and gave their lives in defense of our American way of life.

These brave men and women paid the ultimate price to make sure we could have our picnics, our barbecues, our splashing around in the pool.

The sacrifice of those who gave their lives is honored with each election where not by coup, but by ordinary Americans casting a ballot and choosing those who will lead and represent them.

The power and authority of those officials are transferred from one elected official to the next, from the precinct level to the highest office in the land, the Presidency, without the need for troops in the streets because of those who answered the call to duty, honor and service.

The ability to vote, the ability to choose, the ability to speak our minds, the ability to worship or not worship, the ability to write these words without fear, the ability to work, to succeed, to fail, to rise above our circumstances, all of this we owe to those men and women who fought and died for peace, justice and freedom.

None of our liberties came without cost and thus we owe a debt to those men and women who died in defense of our freedom.

On a personal note:

In those dark days following the sneak attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, four brothers from Nashville, Brown County, Indiana lined up at the recruiting office and joined the US Navy. These four brothers went off to save the world for democracy both in the European Theater and in the Pacific.

Three made it back home at the close of the war. The one who didn’t return was my Great-Uncle Hobert. My grandfather and his other two brothers, Herman and Wesley, came home, but changed, never to be the same.

I never was afforded the pleasure of meeting my Great-Uncle Hobert Powell, a sailor who gave his life for our nation during World War II and long before I was born. The family seldom mentioned his name, but it was apparent Great-Uncle Hobert was not forgotten. His picture, in uniform, hung proudly in my Great-Grandpa Ancil Powell’s living room. In silence, his memory was honored.

Today thousands still are in the fight to keep us safe. Over the past 10+ years, thousands more have shed their blood and forfeited their lives. We must never forget their sacrifice, their bravery, the lives they lived.

This is why we owe a debt of gratitude we can never repay and should never stop repaying.

This is why the deaths of veterans waiting on care from the Veterans Affairs medical facilities is such a gaping wound on the American conscious and must be addressed not after another study, but with action now.

From the Cornfield, I hope each of you will take time from the barbecuing, the playing games with family, watching reruns of yesterday’s race or enjoying the water and sun to stop – remember our heroes who gave their all so that we can live in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Salute to Those Who Gave Their All

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Memorial Day…

For the vast majority of Americans it is just another 3-day weekend and the unofficial start to the summer vacation season. For many others it’s the weekend when millions around the world tune in to watch or listen to the greatest spectacle in racing, the Indy 500.

To too many it’s just a day to get together with family, have picnics and barbecues, go the opening of community pools across the nation. It’s a time to just lay back and enjoy having 3 days off in a row with no worries.

Yet, Memorial Day symbolizes much more. Ask any veterans’ organization or any military person in uniform or any family member who has lost a loved one in war, whether declared or undeclared, in peacetime or wartime.

Memorial Day was meant to be a day a grateful nation pauses to remember those who donned a uniform and gave their lives in defense of our American way of life. These brave men and women paid the ultimate price to make sure we could have our picnics, our barbecues, our splashing around in the pool.

The tradition of Memorial Day originally began in commemoration of those soldiers lost during the Civil War. It was known in various communities and states as Decoration Day. The date set aside was May 30. This was later changed to allow for a 3-day weekend by Congress to be the last Monday in May.

There are many stories as to its actual beginnings, with over two dozen cities and towns laying claim to being the birthplace of Memorial Day. There is also evidence that organized women’s groups in the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War: a hymn published in 1867, “Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping” by Nella L. Sweet carried the dedication “To The Ladies of the South who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead” (Source: Duke University’s Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920).

While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day. It is more likely that it had many separate beginnings; each of those towns and every planned or spontaneous gathering of people to honor the war dead in the 1860’s tapped into the general human need to honor our dead, each contributed honorably to the growing movement that culminated in Gen Logan giving his official proclamation in 1868.

It is not important who was the very first, what is important is that Memorial Day was established. Memorial Day is not about division. It is about reconciliation; it is about coming together to honor those who gave their all.

Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873.

By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363) to ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays), though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19 in Texas, April 26 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10 in South Carolina; and June 3 (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

http://usmemorialday.org/backgrnd.html

It is traditional to fly the flag of the United States at half mast from dawn until noon. Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries. Memorial Day is combined with Jefferson Davis’ Birthday in Mississippi.

Memorial Day started as an event to honor Union soldiers, who had died during the American Civil War. It was inspired by the way people in the Southern states honored their dead. After World War I, it was extended to include all men and women, who died in any war or military action.

http://timeanddate.com/holidays/us/memorial-day

From the Cornfield, I invite one and all to stop this coming Monday at 3 p.m. for a moment to reflect and be thankful to all our fallen heroes. Without their blood we would not be able to enjoy and express the freedoms we hold so dear.

A ‘Day of Infamy’

From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield
From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield

Today marks the 74th anniversary of the attack by the Japanese Imperial Navy on the US of A’s naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared the Monday after the attack:

Yesterday, December 7th, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The attack on Pearl Harbor was the oomph that helped push the US into World War II on the side of the Allies. But it was not the only factor, there were many more as well.

Not only did the Japanese launch an attack at Pearl Harbor that peaceful Sunday morning, but that same day attacked Guam, Wake Island, The Philippines, Malaya, Thailand and Midway.

Eventually General Douglas MacArthur would utter the immortal words, “I shall return,” as he fled The Philippines as the Japanese occupied.

Thousands of American sailors and soldiers lost their lives that sleepy morning. Battleships still lie in rest in the harbor, the watery grave for American lives lost.

In recent years, commemoration of Pearl Harbor Day has seemed to fade. Perhaps in part it can be attributed to the fact that more and more of whom Tom Brokaw called, “The Greatest Generation“, die off. The memory of that tragic day begins to fade as well.

An article detailing 5 myths about Pearl Harbor at TwinCities.com from a few years ago noted:

The attack on Pearl Harbor awoke America from its isolationist slumber and bolstered its charge into the Pacific war, but it did not spur entry into the European war. That happened when Nazi Germany and fascist Italy declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, compelling Roosevelt to respond in kind – thus committing the United States to a world war.

http://twincities.com/opinion/ci_19476298

From the Cornfield, I am hoping those who read this will stop and remember those sailors, marines and soldiers whose lives were lost.

To “The Greatest Generation“, we salute your service, your action and how you kept the world “safe for democracy“.

WWIII – We Are Already There

From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield
From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield

This past week, Pope Francis stated that he was seeing pieces of World War III already taking place, following the Paris 6-prong attacks.

I wrote this op-ed back on June 27:

In social media, on blogs, in coffee shops and pubs, you can hear or read concern if current events may lead us into World War III.

I would submit we are already there.

Whether you believe or do not believe in prophecy – any prophecy – biblical, Islamic or any other, it is interesting that four of the nations currently emeshed in the war on terrorism are named prominently in end of time foretelling. All four are also supporters or providing aid and shelter to jihadists bent on the destruction of the Great Satan, the US of A, and western civilization.

Those four nations are: Libya, Persia or Iran, Syria and the ancient empire of Babylon – Iraq.

When you look at how many nations around the world are involved in this struggle of ideology, it is clear that the world is at war. When you look at how many continents are under attack, it is clear that the world is at war.

One of the stated goals of the Islamic State, the self-proclaimed caliphate, is the ushering in the final battle of Armageddon and the supremacy of Islam over all peoples of the world. From Jerusalem and Babylon, the caliphate will rule the world.

I further submit that World War III began on September 11, 2001. Up until that time there had been bombings and attacks, but each country, each nation dealt with the problem on their own.

With the airliner attacks in New York City and Washington D.C, the majority of the world rallied around the United States in seeking revenge and extracting retribution on Osama bin Laden, Al Qaeda and those who gave them aid and comfort – the Taliban.

Yet this war is not your war of nation against nation. This is a new kind of war of ideology versus ideology, civilization versus civilization. This war is not like any other.

The idea of bringing the world to submission and death to all who oppose has happened before. Most recently in the 1930s and 1940s, we saw the rise of Adolph Hitler and the National Socialist Party (Nazis) seeking the implementation of a 1,000-year Reich and the Aryan Empire. The world rallied against this monster and his henchman along with his allies – the empire of Japan and the fascist state of Benito Mussolini in Italy.

But that was a more traditional struggle. Nations aligned with nations against other nations. This time it is the nations aligning against a foe who does not play by any rules and without geographic boundaries.

If the West is defeated, be assured that the war will not stop. The attention will then turn on Eastern Civilization. China, Japan and Southeast Asia will become the target.

There can only be one outcome.

Either the West destroys or weakens the jihadist terrorists to the point of making them not more than a deadly irritant or the fanatical soldiers of terrorism win.

Will the world survive?

Will nations survive?

Who will win?

Will this war last for decades, centuries, a millennia?

From the Cornfield, are we on the edge of the battle to end all battles or are we allowing emotion and fear to mislead our reality?