Peaceful Transition

Today we are witness to an historic event unlike any other.

For the 44th time in nearly 230 years, we watched the peaceful transition of power from one President to the next President.

Contrast what is happening in Washington DC today to what is happening across the Atlantic Ocean in the West African nation of Gambia.

In that nation a President who came to power in a military coup in 1994 is refusing to leave after he was defeated in an election by the people. The new President was sworn into office in neighboring Senegal.

Last night Senegalese troops moved into Gambia to force the defeated by the voters President from office. Three other West Africa nations also have troops poised to assist.

Back here in the US of A, even though about 1/3 of the Democrats in the House of Representatives boycotted the inauguration of Donald John Trump as the 45th President of the United States and nearly a million protesters marching on the Capitol, the reins of power were handed over by President Barack Obama to his successor without troops or riots.

This is more than just an American tradition. It is the embodiment of what it means to be America. This transferal of power is the very essence that makes our nation, who it is.

Politics, ideological differences, angst over the outcome of the election all pale compared to the significance of this day which is the life blood of our great nation.

From the Cornfield, you may disagree with the politics, the ideology, the party – another right as Americans – but what matters is that we are all Americans.

Congratulations to President Donald J. Trump!

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Mark

Father, grandfather, political pundit - I am Mark Ivy. I am father to two wonderful sons, Dave and Kev, of whom I am very proud;two terrific daughters-in-law, Anna and Hailey; three beautiful granddaughters: Dylan, Alaina and Amelia. On September 2, 2014, I was diagnosed with disseminated histoplasmosis, a fungal infection, discovered by a biopsy of my larynx. The infection is fatal if left untreated. For 2 1/2 years I lived under a death sentence being misdiagnosed with a non-specific bacterial infection which left my right lung a "dried up sponge" and non-functioning. I was aggressively treated for the infection with antifungals. The treatment ended October of 2015 and fortunately did not take two years. I suffer from chronic Horton's Syndrome. The effects vary widely causing various problems. Statistically, Horton's affects only 0.1% of the population. Major depression also attacks me regularly.

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