Pence Takes the Night

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As anyone who knows me or follows my posting From the Cornfield is aware I am not a fan of my Governor Mike Pence. I did not vote for him in 2012 and had he run would not have voted for him this year in a re-election bid.

But last night’s one and only Vice Presidential Debate was clearly a win for Pence. Pence, who is the Republican vice presidential nominee, was calm, cool and collected. He stayed on point.

Pence refused to be lured down a primrose lane lined with thorns, but pivoted adroitly through the pendulums of disaster axes.

His opponent, Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine, came across as more wired than that fuzzy, pink bunny that keeps going and going. It is if Kaine had downed too many energy drinks before coming on stage.

Within the first half hour, Kaine seemed petulant, overly aggressive and out-and-out rude, trying to walk on top of Pence’s statements. Pence came across more presidential and in command of the stage than any of the current candidates running in this presidential election year.

Pence was a total contrast to the top of the ticket, his running mate, GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

But the big question is did Pence stop the bleeding from self-inflicted wounds his running mate opened over the past week?

What we may have seen last night is the person who will be front runner in either the 2020 or 2024 presidential election.

From the Cornfield, Pence takes the night. Hoosiers all over the Cornfield are proud of their Governor this morning, whether they will or have voted for him or not.

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Mark

I am Mark Ivy, a born and bred Hoosier. I am father to two wonderful sons, Dave and Kev, of whom I am very proud; two terrific daughters-in-law, Anna and Hailey; three beautiful granddaughters, Dylan, Alaina and Amelia. On May 9, 2017, my lung specialist hit me with the news I had maybe six months to live if the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the damage caused by the histoplasmosis described below, ran its normal course. I am now on hospice at home. Content and ready to cross over the river to the other side. On September 2, 2014, I was diagnosed with disseminated histoplasmosis, a fungal infection, discovered by a biopsy of my larynx. The infection is fatal if left untreated. For 2 1/2 years I lived under a death sentence being misdiagnosed with a non-specific bacterial infection which left my right lung a "dried up sponge" and non-functioning. I was aggressively treated for the infection with antifungals. The treatment ended October of 2015 and fortunately did not take two years. I suffer from chronic Horton's Syndrome. The effects vary widely causing various problems. Statistically, Horton's affects only 0.1% of the population. Major depression also attacks me regularly.

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