‘Trust Me’ – Um – No

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Nearly two years ago I penned an article on politicians telling people to “trust me“. With a couple of alterations that article is on point with this year’s presidential election cycle.

It is not as if we have never been warned.

Our parents warned us. Our teachers warned us. Our ministers warned us. Psychologists have warned us. Prosecutors and judges, especially television judges, have warned us. Talk show hosts with cheating guests have warned us.

Yet over and over again it seems we, human beings, never listen.

The first words out of someone caught doing something they shouldn’t or someone’s other half is caught cheating, it is always the same two words, “Trust me.

Americans, especially voters, seem to throw all caution to the wind every time some politician answers a question or peppers a speech with those two problematic words. A defendant or witness in a criminal or civil trial is immediately suspect, yet jurors seem to ignore the flashing red letters, as the person sitting in the witness box declares, “Trust me.

What is it in the psyche of humanity that seems prone to allow those who intone as if pontificating from the heavens, “Trust me“, to get away with it?

In this election season we have a candidate in the world of politics, in the land of public service, who has in essence pronounced this dictate to potential voters, “Trust me.

That candidate is Texas Senator Ted Cruz. A banner is emblazoned in the background at all his rallies with “TrusTed”.

Sadly, too many will be duped by what we have all been warned is a clear sign and reason to run the other way. Sadly too many of us will hold our nose, close our eyes, grin and bear it. Sadly too many of us will once more fall for those two words which almost never end well – “Trust me.

I am not saying that Cruz is not worthy of a vote or cannot be held to his word.

What I am saying is that we should all “trust, but verify“, as Ronald Reagan advised. Sadly, too many of us will find it too hard to verify and hope for the best instead.

Let’s not go blindly down a road pitted with potholes and think we can escape the jarring and damage to the undercarriage of our life vehicles.

From the Cornfield, when will we learn, especially when it’s a politician who is mouthing the words, “Trust me“, to stop, look and listen before crossing a busy highway into the onrushing traffic?

How many more times must we be fooled before there is “reasonable doubt” when anyone, especially a politician, looks us dead in the eyes and says, “Trust me“?

When is enough, enough?

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Mark

Father, grandfather, political pundit - I am Mark Ivy. I am father to two wonderful sons, Dave and Kev, of whom I am very proud;two terrific daughters-in-law, Anna and Hailey; three beautiful granddaughters: Dylan, Alaina and Amelia. On September 2, 2014, I was diagnosed with disseminated histoplasmosis, a fungal infection, discovered by a biopsy of my larynx. The infection is fatal if left untreated. For 2 1/2 years I lived under a death sentence being misdiagnosed with a non-specific bacterial infection which left my right lung a "dried up sponge" and non-functioning. I was aggressively treated for the infection with antifungals. The treatment ended October of 2015 and fortunately did not take two years. I suffer from chronic Horton's Syndrome. The effects vary widely causing various problems. Statistically, Horton's affects only 0.1% of the population. Major depression also attacks me regularly.

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